National Centenarian Awareness Project
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Founded in 1989 by Lynn Peters Adler, J.D.
Centenarian Expert and Older Adults Advocate

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Ms. magazine: 20th Century Foxes
Interviews by Lynn Peters Adler, Founder and Director, National Centenarian Awareness Project
A Century of

Women

 Agueda Martinez, 101

 Agueda Martinez, 101
Born: March 13, 1898; Chamita, N. Mex.
Resides: Medanales, M. Mex.
Descendants: 10 children, 69 grandchildren, 149 great grandchildren,
59 great-great-grandchildren, Occupation: Weaver, homemaker


Agueda Martinez lives on her family farm with one of her daughters. For years she raised her children and farmed with her husband through the day, and then wove blankets and rugs at night, using kerosene lamps for light. Martinez, who describes her weaving as "a dance on the loom," is a world-renowned artist, but she says her family is her greatest pride. The Oscar-nominated film Agueda Martinez: Our People, Our Country documents her life. She continues to work at her loom six hours a day, and she has taught her art to many of her progeny.

What was the most important thing that happened for women during this century? Voting! My father was a justice of the peace. He taught us the importance of voting. These people today who don't vote when they have the opportunity are wrong. It's very important to vote. I get upset with my family if they don't vote.

How did it affect your life? My husband was very interested in politics and volunteered for local campaigns. I got involved, too.

What advice would you give to girls today? Get a good education, because you don't know what's ahead of you. It's not like your husband will take care of you — nowadays it's a fifty-fifty world.

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