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Founded in 1989 by Lynn Peters Adler, J.D.
Centenarian Expert and Older Adults Advocate

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Edna Anderson turns 100!

Edna Anderson, a 14-year resident of a Phoenix, Arizona, senior living community, reached the century mark on December 24th 2005. The centenarian was born on Christmas Eve in 1905, the same year American short-story writer O. Henry wrote “The Gift of the Magi.”
       As a 25-year volunteer at a Sun City, Arizona, hospital, Anderson’s gift for creating tray favors helped brighten the day of countless patients. The crafty lady has a flair for designing inexpensive holiday decorations with such expressive materials as lace doilies, cotton balls, pipe cleaners, pinecones, seedpods and yarn. Even at 99-years-young her nimble fingers strung beads together to create promise bracelets for the Thomas J. Pappas School for homeless children, also in Phoenix.

Edna Anderson at age 100.
Edna Anderson

       Anderson has unselfishly devoted her lifetime to helping others, and after 100 years she took the spotlight when Lifetime Television aired “Health Corner” in January 2006 (PLEASE NOTE: an encore of "Health Corner" will air August 13, 2006, on Lifetime Television. Please check your local listings for air times). On November 18th the cameras focused on the soon-to-be-centenarian to discover her secrets to longevity.
       During the interview she was asked: “Is it is better to be old and wise, or young and carefree?” Her wise reply: “Better to be older and carefree would be my preference.
       "Good health is the most important thing,” Anderson acknowledged. “Getting old is great. I don’t see as well, but since I don’t need a cane or walker I feel more like 75 or 80, than 100.”
       Once an avid golfer, she now keeps up to par with long walks. She attributes being dealt a good hand in life to twice weekly bridge games, attending theatre, a good social life and going to church every Sunday.
       “All 100 years have been wonderful,” said Anderson, as she marveled at a century filled with technologic advancements. “Time goes so fast. I should have learned email instead of always using the phone. No cell phone, that’s how old-fashioned I am.”
       In July 2005, she attended a good, old-fashioned family reunion celebrating her 100th year with her two children, eight grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren in Columbus, Ohio.

 

Edna Anderson celebrates her 100th birthday.
Edna Anderson celebrates her
100th birthday with friends
on December 24th 2005.

Edna Anderson ready for her interview for Lifetime TV Network.
Edna Anderson is ready for her
interview for the Lifetime Network
TV show "Health Corner."


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